Anaconda Enters Pig Pen–Eats Pig

Anaconda Enters Pig Pen–Eats Pig

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Feeding day for a big hungry anaconda.

Anacondas are actually large snakes.

Video taken on June 9, 2017 of a giant Anaconda consuming a feeder pig.

The inexperienced anaconda (Eunectes murinus) is the biggest snake on the planet by weight, and the second longest.

Animation in video reveals a snake’s decrease jaw shouldn’t be joined by an elastic ligament on the entrance (chin) that permits the 2 halves to unfold aside, linked in entrance by an elastic ligament. Each half of decrease jaw strikes independently.

Quadrate bones behind snake’s skulls at attachment factors to decrease jaws, will not be rigidly hooked up. They pivot permitting vertical and horizontal rotation. This permits ingestion of huge prey resembling this pig.

Video for on-line diploma applications, bachelor diploma accreditation, and biostatistics for reptile feeding habits; and levels in zoology.

Shows the pterygoid stroll of snake’s jaws. Quadrate bones at again of snake’s skulls at attachment factors to decrease jaws will not be rigidly hooked up. They pivot permitting vertical and horizontal rotation. This permits ingestion of huge prey resembling this pig.

This video focuses on the science of snake habits to help a grasp’s thesis. Video is for quotation for junior highschool, highschool science experiences.

Super-sized meals resembling this pig don’t intimidate snakes. Unlike a mammalian jaw which is constructed for brute chewing or biting power — as you possibly can see on this video — a snake’s jaws are linked with tendons and ligaments that offers it a gymnast’s flexibility.

Jaws of snakes don’t dislocate. One of the enduring myths of snake feeding mechanisms is that the jaws detach. They keep linked on a regular basis. As seen within the video, the 2 decrease jaws transfer independently of each other. The quadrate bone shouldn’t be rigidly hooked up to the cranium, however articulates with the cranium at one finish and is subsequently free transferring.

Video reveals the “transport cycle” to get the pig into the python’s stomach. Called a pterygoid stroll, the python opens its jaw and alternately ratchets its higher jaw over the floor of the meal, in flip “walking” its mouth over and across the prey.

Filmed with the University of Guadalajara for Biological and Agricultural Sciences, the division of Biological and Environmental Science Division, on the division of Botany and Zoology.

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Snake
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